France presents controversial reform to the pension system | News

The French Prime Minister, Elisabeth Borne, will present this Tuesday a plan to reform the pension system that seeks to delay the retirement age that has already aroused strong criticism and calls for protests by left-wing opponents and unions.

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The minimum retirement age to qualify for a full pension is expected to rise gradually from 62 to 64 or 65, in line with a longstanding promise by President Emmanuel Macron.

The measure, since it was announced to the media, has provoked a strong rejection from the workers’ centrals and unions, which indicated that the project will not pass, while considering carrying out mobilizations and strikes.

The head of state has said that the French must work harder to balance the pension budget, one of the most expensive in the industrialized world.

Macron will also agree to extend the reform over nine years, at a rate of four months per year to delay the retirement age, which, according to the accounts of the Minister of Finance, Gabriel Attal, will already mean savings of some 8,000 million .

The Government intends to increase the amount of the minimum pension, today in a thousand euros, which could be increased to 1,100 or 1,200, as long as they have contributed for 43 years (currently 42).

However, the two extremes of the parliamentary forces, Agrupación Nacional (RN) and La Francia Insumisa (LFI) will directly oppose the reform, each with their very different arguments.

The Government does not rule out resorting to the controversial parliamentary procedure, known as 49.3, which allows it to adopt a law without putting it to a vote.

In France, this pension project has raised a great discussion in the televised and written media.

In his New Year’s speech, Macron defended that the reform seeks to balance the pension fund, which would register a deficit due to the increase in life expectancy, and protect its redistributive system.

In France, active workers pay the pensions of retirees, whose percentage gradually increases compared to the former.

Disclaimer: Via Telesur – Translated by RJ983

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