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Spain reports more than 4,600 deaths attributable to heat this summer | News

The Carlos III Health Institute (ISCIII) of Spain reported this Friday that the country has registered 4,601 deaths attributable to the heat waves that have hit the region, specifically between June 1 and August 24.

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According to the entity, the data recorded in the last three months is almost triple that recorded in the similar summer stage of 2021, in which 1,353 deaths attributed to high temperatures were reported.

So far in 2022, the ISCIII Daily Mortality Monitoring System (MoMo) has registered a total of 311,331 deaths, exceeding its initial forecasts of 281,325 deaths.

Since the beginning of the summer, Spain has reported 111,549 deaths, of which 44,671 occurred in July, 37,175 so far in August, while June had the lowest values, with 29,703.

As explained by the Professor of Preventive Medicine and Public Health at the University of Valencia, Óscar Zurriaga, high temperatures can worsen a person’s health condition or cause death.

In this sense, the MoMo determined that the increase in deaths in the last three months coincides with the occurrence of heat waves. The calculations estimated that, in 25 non-consecutive days of excessive temperatures, just over a third of heat-related deaths occurred, which is equivalent to approximately 69 deaths on each of those days.

MoMo statistics reported that between June 11 and 18, when the first heat wave occurred, there were 373 deaths as a result of high temperatures. The second was more intense, lasting and covered a larger area, for which it registered 845 deaths, five times those recorded in a shorter and lighter episode in a similar period in 2021.

Another rise of 575 deaths due to heat was between July 30 and August 6, when another wave was recorded, coinciding with a stage that the State Meteorological Agency (Aemet) catalogs as the second warmest since the first fortnight of August 2003.

So far, Madrid (the capital) is the one with the highest number of deaths, along with the central-western and northern regions that lack a coast.

The MoMo system bases its estimates on a mathematical model based on three data sources: civil registries, temperature calculations provided by the State Meteorological Agency and population censuses from the National Institute of Statistics.

Disclaimer: Via Telesur – Translated by RJ983

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